Discussion:
new flex gold alloy
(too old to reply)
Scaupaug1
2004-12-11 19:17:44 UTC
Permalink
Ok, I perhaps got a little carried away...

A custom gold alloy was made that flexes akin to the classic 1890s style - yet
better still it is EXTREMELY hard stuff at 14K, even harder at 12K. As an
experiment a 51 nib was cut as a series of extra needle fines - 16 in all,
approximately 2mm wide total. This is the closest to a metallic brush I've yet
seen on a gold nib. The pure ruthenium tips are 1.2mm deep for a very long nib
life. As the gold is so durable in this alloy, the flex can be quite dramatic
without risking a splay or hairline.....although every flex alloy 51 music and
brush nib needs a backing between itself and the cone wall deeper within the
pen or the flex will not function.

A rigid sheaffer lifetime nib had the tines reformed with the same alloy and it
now can be pushed to the limits of a 90 degree bend WITHOUT a splay or
hairline...and with complete recovery to the original tine partition. It's
good stuff...perhaps not identical to the 1890s masters long since dead..but
who knows? We have more alloys today...perhaps it is better?

I'll post images next week of a few of these in operation.
PENMART01
2004-12-11 19:56:57 UTC
Permalink
(Scaupaug1)
Ok, I perhaps got a little carried away...
A custom gold alloy was made that flexes akin to the classic 1890s style - yet
better still it is EXTREMELY hard stuff at 14K, even harder at 12K. As an
experiment a 51 nib was cut as a series of extra needle fines - 16 in all,
approximately 2mm wide total. This is the closest to a metallic brush I've yet
seen on a gold nib. The pure ruthenium tips are 1.2mm deep for a very long nib
life. As the gold is so durable in this alloy, the flex can be quite dramatic
without risking a splay or hairline.....although every flex alloy 51 music and
brush nib needs a backing between itself and the cone wall deeper within the
pen or the flex will not function.
A rigid sheaffer lifetime nib had the tines reformed with the same alloy and it
now can be pushed to the limits of a 90 degree bend WITHOUT a splay or
hairline...and with complete recovery to the original tine partition. It's
good stuff...perhaps not identical to the 1890s masters long since dead..but
who knows? We have more alloys today...perhaps it is better?
I'll post images next week of a few of these in operation.
That the properties of gold can be tailored drastically depending on with what
metals it's alloyed is nothing new, in fact it was a constant bone of
contention between Frank D. and myself... he just couldn't seem to grasp the
concept of gold alloying past that of Karats (percentage of gold).


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
Scaupaug1
2004-12-18 03:48:25 UTC
Permalink
Sheldon wrote:
"That the properties of gold can be tailored drastically depending on with what
metals it's alloyed is nothing new, in fact it was a constant bone of
contention between Frank D. and myself..."

I know...! It's a VERY old artform. It is also, however - hard to reverse
engineer some of the originals (some modern alloys can be better too!). It is
also tricky to change an alloy on an existing nib WITHOUT touching the original
imprints at the base of the nib.
Nick Name
2004-12-12 04:00:15 UTC
Permalink
Is this something that will become available? I would love to be able
to buy a modern pen, a Pelikan or Bexley perhaps, with a true
built-to-flex flex nib. I would be very interested in something like
that.
Free Citizen
2004-12-13 12:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Name
Is this something that will become available? I would love to be able
to buy a modern pen, a Pelikan or Bexley perhaps, with a true
built-to-flex flex nib. I would be very interested in something like
that.
Yes, indeed. Does this mean we will have fountain pens that are suitable for
Ornamental Writing? Wow!
--
Best regards,
T-H Lim
(aka Free Citizen)
Scaupaug1
2004-12-18 03:50:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Name
Is this something that will become available?
Now and then, on a vintage pen nib - but I doubt the major manufacturers would
care about it in the slightest.

Here is the site...I hope the "format" is OK, text follows photos:

http://members.aol.com/scaupaug1/51nibs/index.html
az
2004-12-13 08:47:39 UTC
Permalink
All right!....
Let see this baby :-)

Antonios Z.
Free Citizen
2004-12-13 12:43:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scaupaug1
Ok, I perhaps got a little carried away...
A custom gold alloy was made that flexes akin to the classic 1890s style - yet
better still it is EXTREMELY hard stuff at 14K, even harder at 12K. As an
experiment a 51 nib was cut as a series of extra needle fines - 16 in all,
approximately 2mm wide total. This is the closest to a metallic brush I've yet
seen on a gold nib. The pure ruthenium tips are 1.2mm deep for a very long nib
life. As the gold is so durable in this alloy, the flex can be quite dramatic
without risking a splay or hairline.....although every flex alloy 51 music and
brush nib needs a backing between itself and the cone wall deeper within the
pen or the flex will not function.
A rigid sheaffer lifetime nib had the tines reformed with the same alloy and it
now can be pushed to the limits of a 90 degree bend WITHOUT a splay or
hairline...and with complete recovery to the original tine partition.
It's
good stuff...perhaps not identical to the 1890s masters long since dead..but
who knows? We have more alloys today...perhaps it is better?
I'll post images next week of a few of these in operation.
Custom gold alloy? Wow, did you write the specification for this alloy? And
you say it is extremely hard. That must mean you have "spring gold" as
opposed to "spring steel". Very interesting. I look forward your images :)
--
Best regards,
T-H Lim
(aka Free Citizen)
Scaupaug1
2004-12-18 05:30:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Free Citizen
Custom gold alloy? Wow, did you write the specification for this alloy? And
you say it is extremely hard. That must mean you have "spring gold" as
opposed to "spring steel". Very interesting. I look forward your images :)
Varies between nibs. There is one alloy that works well flexing Sheaffer 14K
triumph nibs...but does not work well with Parker 51/61 nibs (which require
another alloy) or Parker vac nibs...yet a third alloy for the soft gold of
modern pelikan nibs (which have the lowest melting point of all the alloys!).
Formulas? Written in chalk on a slate...don't want any paper around due to
safety. It is always a work in progress with vintage nibs - take a handful of
vintage nibs from anyone's parts drawer and you'll have a couple hundred
divergent alloys! Manufacturers changed their alloy from time to time -
especially those in Europe (due to war, inflation, economic or company
problems) whereas Parker and Sheaffer are remarkably consistent over the
decades (excluding Parker UK). Large Swan nibs tend to be consistent overseas
though. The numerous formulas are needed IF one is to change a nib to a flex
nib WITHOUT causing any change in the original nib imprint. Certain key
elements recently enabled sufficient hardness to the flex gold so that
incredibly fine tines could be made that could endure the force of writing and
flexing without any splay. Frank himself counted more than a thousand
different makes of broken nibs in a single small plastic bag a few years ago -
although "14K was 14K" to him at times. 14K to me can be rainbow, red, green,
blue, pink, yellow, flex, rigid, you name it...and all still be "14K". Frank
sometimes cursed my eyes if I spotted a crack that he had not seen before - if
he were still with us I believe he would mumble something about my eyes again
(every one of these nibs is hand slit by sight, no machine guidance and I don't
need a loupe as it only gets in the way).

http://members.aol.com/scaupaug1/51nibs/index.html
Free Citizen
2004-12-18 05:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scaupaug1
Post by Free Citizen
Custom gold alloy? Wow, did you write the specification for this alloy? And
you say it is extremely hard. That must mean you have "spring gold" as
opposed to "spring steel". Very interesting. I look forward to your images
:)
Varies between nibs. There is one alloy that works well flexing Sheaffer 14K
triumph nibs...but does not work well with Parker 51/61 nibs (which require
another alloy) or Parker vac nibs...yet a third alloy for the soft gold of
modern pelikan nibs (which have the lowest melting point of all the alloys!).
Formulas? Written in chalk on a slate...don't want any paper around due to
safety. It is always a work in progress with vintage nibs - take a handful of
vintage nibs from anyone's parts drawer and you'll have a couple hundred
divergent alloys! Manufacturers changed their alloy from time to time -
especially those in Europe (due to war, inflation, economic or company
problems) whereas Parker and Sheaffer are remarkably consistent over the
decades (excluding Parker UK). Large Swan nibs tend to be consistent overseas
though. The numerous formulas are needed IF one is to change a nib to a flex
nib WITHOUT causing any change in the original nib imprint. Certain key
elements recently enabled sufficient hardness to the flex gold so that
incredibly fine tines could be made that could endure the force of writing and
flexing without any splay. Frank himself counted more than a thousand
different makes of broken nibs in a single small plastic bag a few years ago -
although "14K was 14K" to him at times. 14K to me can be rainbow, red, green,
blue, pink, yellow, flex, rigid, you name it...and all still be "14K".
Frank
sometimes cursed my eyes if I spotted a crack that he had not seen before - if
he were still with us I believe he would mumble something about my eyes again
(every one of these nibs is hand slit by sight, no machine guidance and I don't
need a loupe as it only gets in the way).
http://members.aol.com/scaupaug1/51nibs/index.html
Thank you Nathan,

For that illuminating discourse on precious metallurgy. You are right that
there can be many variations in 14K gold. Pure gold is too soft to be of
much use. So is pure iron. My understanding of steel is that a minuscule
content of 0.25% carbon in iron makes all the difference that will render it
strong enough for building a skyscraper. I have seen your pics. Are those
stamped out from gold sheets or strips? Some indication of cost would be
nice.
--
Best regards,
T-H Lim
(aka Free Citizen)
Practical Italic Handwriting
http://members.boardhost.com/jp29/
Scaupaug1
2004-12-18 06:21:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Free Citizen
I have seen your pics. Are those
stamped out from gold sheets or strips? Some indication of cost would be
nice.
Those are original 51 and 61 nibs...except for the front third of each nib
which has considerably more gold than standard nibs. They are tipped with in
excess of 1mm deep pure ruthenium (should last 80+ years based on how long
sheaffer 1950s ruthenium has been wearing, longer than platinum sister alloys).
The new gold alloy is formed in molten gold upon the original nib - in
combination with the original nib alloy (hence the numerous adjustments to
formulas). Each one of those nibs has the original nib imprints at the base of
each nib. As to cost? That depends upon what you want (the list of
possibilities is long)...I will say they average 1/9th custom nib costs in
Japan (EXCLUDING a factory nib that is only ground a certain way...this
involves custom nib structure, not just a point shape adjustment off an
assembly line nib). Remove "inky" from the e-mail address and you'll get me.

Next group I'll put up will be of the needle fine flex nibs (I wish Rob
Morrison could write the test lines with them though...my tests show the flex
in action, but are far from artistic!!).
Free Citizen
2004-12-20 05:26:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scaupaug1
Post by Free Citizen
I have seen your pics. Are those
stamped out from gold sheets or strips? Some indication of cost would be
nice.
Those are original 51 and 61 nibs...except for the front third of each nib
which has considerably more gold than standard nibs. They are tipped with in
excess of 1mm deep pure ruthenium (should last 80+ years based on how long
sheaffer 1950s ruthenium has been wearing, longer than platinum sister alloys).
The new gold alloy is formed in molten gold upon the original nib - in
combination with the original nib alloy (hence the numerous adjustments to
formulas). Each one of those nibs has the original nib imprints at the base of
each nib. As to cost? That depends upon what you want (the list of
possibilities is long)...I will say they average 1/9th custom nib costs in
Japan (EXCLUDING a factory nib that is only ground a certain way...this
involves custom nib structure, not just a point shape adjustment off an
assembly line nib). Remove "inky" from the e-mail address and you'll get me.
Next group I'll put up will be of the needle fine flex nibs (I wish Rob
Morrison could write the test lines with them though...my tests show the flex
in action, but are far from artistic!!).
Thanks Nathan,

We'll sure to keep you in mind.
--
Best regards,
T-H Lim
(aka Free Citizen)
Practical Italic Handwriting
http://members.boardhost.com/jp29/
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